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Data Set

How Do Factor Premia Vary Over Time? A Century of Evidence, Factor Data Monthly

This is the updated data set related to the paper “How Do Factor Premia Vary Over Time? A Century of Evidence,” in which we examine four prominent factor premia – value, momentum, carry, and defensive – over a century from six asset classes.

Data Set

Value and Momentum Everywhere: Factors, Monthly

We have updated and extended the data set for the paper, “Value and Momentum Everywhere.” Our research shows consistent value and momentum return premia in eight diverse markets and asset classes, and a common factor structure among their returns.

Data Set

Value and Momentum Everywhere: Portfolios, Monthly

We have updated our data set for our paper “Value and Momentum Everywhere,” in which we find consistent value and momentum return premia across eight diverse markets and asset classes, and a common factor structure among their returns.

Data Set

The Devil in HML's Details: Factors, Monthly

We have updated and extended our data set for “The Devil in HML’s Details” (Asness and Frazzini, 2013). We include long/short HML Devil returns for the U.S. and 23 international equity markets updated monthly.

Data Set

The Devil in HML's Details: Factors, Daily

We have updated and extended our data set for “The Devil in HML’s Details” (Asness and Frazzini, 2013). We include long/short HML Devil returns for the U.S. and 23 international equity markets updated monthly.

Perspective

Is Value Just an Interest Rate Bet?

It seems obvious to so many that interest rates drive the value trade. After all, growth stocks have much longer-dated cash flows than value stocks and thus should be a “longer duration” asset and move more with longer-term interest rates, right? This is taken as an axiomatic given in countless pundit and press observations. However, it’s not nearly that simple, and mostly it’s just not true.

Perspective

Value Spreads Are Back to Tech Bubble Highs: Is Everyone Out There Cray-Cray?

This adds another three months of data to the May entry in our series of value spread updates. Over the past two months, some portion of the market went temporarily (I hope) insane, punishing value, as we measure it, to the point where the value spread has retraced most of its modest gains since the beginning of the year. The world doesn’t steadily move a little bit towards what we think is rational each day – painfully for us, it’s not a linear process. But this changes nothing about our belief in the outlook for value.

Perspective

We Are Not Just Value! Except, You Know, When We Are...

Our systematic stock selection process is far from just “value.” And yet from 2018-2020 for the bad and 2021-2022 for the good, our world has indeed been all about value. What gives? This post reviews our correlation to value, delving into a few periods when it became the dominant part of our process. We find that when value dominates, it has usually been in bubble periods of irrational losses for value (and in their more pleasant aftermaths).

Perspective

Value Investing Is Not All About Tech

It often seems like the world sees value investing as either implicitly or explicitly all about the technology sector vs. everything else. In reality, there are many different kinds of strategies and bets that are often labeled “value.” Our value bet is long and short extremely diversified portfolios of global stocks with a serious attempt not to bet on industries (like tech) – and we are very happy about that, both long-term strategically and tactically today.

Perspective

Still Crazy After All This YTD

Over these additional three months, value’s returns, as we measure them, have continued apace. Since February, the value spread has fallen slightly, though it remains near its tech bubble peak, at around a 95th percentile. Reminder — a massive valuation dislocation says very little about the timing of when it falls back to earth. But it’s nice to see it start and still leave the spread incredibly high.